The Whisky Tasting Club The Whisky Tasting Club

Islands Tasting

Island hop around Arran, Jura, Mull, the Orkneys and Skye.

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Jura Superstition

Jura is most easily reached by a small ferry from Islay. With a population of around 200 on an island about 30 miles long, Jura makes Islay feel like a bustling metropolis. Dominating the island are three mountains known as the paps. The islands single road winds along the eastern coast, passing through the only village, Craighouse, which is also the location of the island pub and distillery. The Superstition is one of Juraís classic range. It is a lightly peated easy drinking dram.

The Whisky Tasting Club Notes:
Nose: Condensed milk, green fruits, sherbet and wood. Sticky toffee pudding.
Palate: Milky and thin at first. Growing rich, smoky, spicy and slightly bitter at the death.

Retails for around £30

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Ledaig 10 year old

Ledaig (pronounced led-chig), meaning safe haven in Gaelic, is made at the Tobermory distillery on the Isle of Mull, an inner Hebridean island directly north of Islay and Jura. The distillery was established in 1823, but has been inactive for long periods of its life. In 2002 it was taken over by Burn Stewart and has since gone from strength to strength. About half the production is the lightly peated Tobermory, half the more peaty Ledaig. You may find a cheap no-age-statement Ledaig in supermarkets, but it is worth spending the extra to get this excellent higher strength ten year old.

The Whisky Tasting Club Notes:
Nose: Sweet and herbal, custardy, oaty, citrus and hot tarmac.
Palate: Meadowsweet, lemon peel, seaweed, sour peat and late vanilla.

Retails for around £35-40

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Highland Park 12 year old

The Orkney Islands are an archipelago off the North East coast of Scotland inhabited by about 20,000 people. Of the 70 odd islands in Orkney, only 20 are inhabited. Orkney has two distilleries, Highland Park and Scapa, both based on the largest of the islands, which is somewhat confusingly called the Mainland. Highland Park is one of the iconic Scottish distilleries, highly prized by whisky collectors. Honey is at the heart of Highland Park, but so is peat, which is cut from a moor close to the distillery.

The Whisky Tasting Club Notes:
Nose: A flirty flash of malt thigh, with shades of honey, barley and peat, seductively asking if you want to come in without giving too much away.
Palate: Taste wise this one goes through the gears, cruising through a barley and honey overture, steering its way between wood, fruit and spice, and putting the peat pedal down as it accelerate to its conclusion.
Finish: The various components finish equal first and in style.

Retails for around £30

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Talisker Storm

Skye is the most northerly island of the Inner Hebrides and has a population of 10,000. Linked to the mainland by the 570m long Skye bridge (which is now free to use), it is a beautiful island and a popular tourist destination.

Talisker, located beside Loch Harport on the west coast of the island, is one of drinks giant Diageoís classic malts range. Taliskerís taste profile is peated (at around 18-22 ppm), peppery and reminiscent of the sea. This no-age statement edition was released in 2013.

The Whisky Tasting Club Notes:
Nose: Intense but with a light and fruity (melon and peaches?) edge. Peppery and peaty. Volcanic and rocky. More intense than the 10 year old.
Palate: Immediately intensely peppery and peaty and again that soft underlying fruity (this time more red fruits) edge which vies for attention with the usual Talisker volcanic elements.

Retails for around £35-40

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